Sudan Archives – Come Meh Way

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EXCELLENT artist Sudan Archives is back with Come Meh Way :

Violinist and vocalist, Sudan Archives writes, plays, and produces her own music. Drawing inspiration from Sudanese fiddlers, she is self-taught on the violin, and her unique songs also fold in elements of R&B, and experimental electronic music.

Sudan Archives grew up in Cincinnati, Ohio, where she “messed around with instruments in the house” and took up violin in the fourth grade, eventually teaching herself how to play the instrument by ear. When she discovered the violin playing style of Northeast Africa, her eyes opened to the possibilities of the instrument. “The way they played it was different from classical music. I resonated with the style, and I was like, ‘Maybe I can use this style with electronic music,'” she says.
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This fusing of folk music and electronic production was the turning point for Sudan. “I started mixing my violin into beats,” she says, “It wasn’t complicated — I’d just sing straight into the iPad.” She honed her at-home style after moving to Los Angeles aged 19 to study music technology, and after a chance encounter at a Low End Theory party with Stones Throw A&R and Leaving Records owner Matthewdavid, she signed with Stones Throw. At the very start of her musical career, she’s already won plaudits from the likes of the New York Times and Pitchfork, and played live at experimental festival Moogfest.

Natascha Rogers – TEARS

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Video clip directed By Pauline Pénicaud.

Choreographers and dancers :
Salomon Asaro
Natascha Rogers

Recorded at Le Deux Pièces Cuisine ( France )

Music written and Composed by Natascha Rogers and Ouriel Ellert.

Diron Animal – Alone

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Born and raised in the Angolan ghetto of Cazenga, the now Portuguese-based instrumentalist’s new record is a melting pot of musical styles and cultures.

“I come from tribal music” says Diron. “I had a traditional music group, then I moved to a Capoeira group where I was a main corrido and I played batuque. Around that time I also started introducing Hip Hop and Kuduro styles. Then I mixed Kuduro with Hip Hop and Kuduro with Rock. Now I am making music for all people and all ages.”

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With a foot firmly set in his ghetto roots, the album is a personal exploration:“Cazenga is a place where a lot of the Angolan dances were invented, where children roam around barefoot and have no food but can transform their struggles into creativity”, says Diron.

This movement and struggle is at the core of the new record. Traditional African styles blended with Portugal’s frenetic electronic music style, culminate in a vibrant, energetic and rhythmic record that deals in both adversity and positivity.

Listen to the first track, Alone. The LP will be available in october 4th 🙂

Zara McFarlane – All Africa

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On ‘All Africa’, Zara McFarlane re-casts a landmark track by Max Roach. Taken from We Insist!, his 1960 album born of the US’ then-ascendant Civil Rights Movement, it saw avant-garde jazz used as vehicle for protest. With Roach and vocalist Abbey Lincoln at its core, it nodded to the growing independence movements then emerging in several African nations. The original track’s celebration of the present, past and future of Africa feels as relevant now as it did in 1960.

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Taking the original’s all-out, percussive trip into a looser, more softly mesmerising kind of territory, this new version combines pulsing rhythm with a brighter musicality. The Alternate Take, meanwhile, follows a more groove-oriented direction. Punctuated by bursts of horns and a foot-tapping, syncopated rhythm, it hints at a globally-interconnected spirit.

Zara McFarlane – Vocals
Nathaniel Cross – Trombone
Moses Boyd – Drums
Jay Darwish – Upright and Electric Bass
Ashley Henry – Keys
Junior Alli-Balogun – Percussion
Binker Golding – Tenor Saxophone